If you’re getting divorced and your ex is threatening to seek sole custody of the children, you know the case could get contentious. At the same time, you may know that you don’t even want sole custody rights. You want to share joint rights with your spouse. Isn’t that best for the children?

Health and development

It generally is. If both parents are involved, health and development tends to improve when compared to children who just see one parent.

On one hand, this may make it easier for them to adjust to the divorce. They don’t feel like they’ve lost a parent. Yes, the schedule has changed, and they don’t see Mom and Dad together as much, but the overall family unit is still largely intact, from a child’s perspective.

But it’s more than just making the children happy or making divorce easier for them, as important as those things are. Studies have shown that children with two involved parents:

  • Have fewer stress-related illnesses
  • Get better grades in school
  • Do not struggle with depression and anxiety as often
  • Are less likely to use illegal drugs, drink while underage or smoke cigarettes

These are very real benefits that can help define the rest of a child’s life. In divorce cases, the court is not considering what the parents want first. The court always considers the children’s best interests and then makes decisions for the parents that work toward those best interests. These are just a few of the reasons why they take that mindset.

Protecting your family

You know you want to protect your family and put your kids first. Now take the time to consider the legal options you have to do so.