Emotions often run high at the holidays, which can make coparenting challenges feel like a roadblock. Prevent conflict with your child’s other parent by planning ahead for the holiday season. 

Thinking through these factors can help the custody schedule run smoothly and reduce potential stress during this busy time of year. 

Review your agreement

If you have newly divorced, you might already know what your custody schedule says about the holidays. If you have been sharing custody for a few years, your agreement might not include a specific holiday schedule. If the agreement no longer works for your family, you can request a modification in Tennessee if circumstances have substantially changed since the initial custody order. 

Stick to a fair arrangement 

Some of the most common ways to split holidays include splitting the day of the holiday in half or alternating years the child spends with each parent. Depending on each parent’s culture, background and preferences, you may agree to give the other parent certain holidays every year as long as you can have others. On the years you will not spend the holiday with your child, make a tradition of celebrating on a different day. If you get along well with your coparent, you might even decide to spend the holiday together. 

Schedule downtime 

Your kids might feel exhausted from attending holiday celebrations with both sides of the family. Make sure you spend plenty of time relaxing together at home, especially when your kids are little. 

Taking time to talk as a family about the holiday season expectations can start with these three considerations.